Sep
7
Fri
France as a Laboratory of Culture International Workshop @ Maison Française Columbia University
Sep 7 @ 9:15 am – 7:00 pm
Sep
9
Sun
Rare Book School “Exploring Ephemera” Seminar @ Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
Sep 9 @ 6:00 pm – Sep 11 @ 6:00 pm

Rare Book School is sponsoring a two-day seminar, “Exploring Ephemera,” at the Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library and the University of Delaware on Monday and Tuesday 10–11 September, 2018, preceded by a group dinner on Sunday, 9 September. 

Drawing on the remarkable holdings of the two Delaware institutions, this two-day workshop offers an opportunity to explore the history, production methods, typography, circulation, use and meaning of ephemera produced from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries in America and Britain. Hands-on study of the physical nature of ephemera will be the main emphasis of the seminar, but the value of the materials for scholarship, teaching, and exhibition purposes will also be considered. 

This seminar has been designed to be of interest to curators, collectors, and librarians of all kinds who care for, research, and teach with ephemera collections, but enrollment is open to anyone with an interest in the topics covered. 

Sep
27
Thu
Peace and Justice Studies Association Conference 2018 “Revolutionary Nonviolence in Violent Times” @ Arcadia University
Sep 27 @ 7:00 am – Sep 30 @ 10:00 pm

The 2018 conference of the Peace and Justice Studies Association will be hosted by the International Peace and Conflict Resolution program at Arcadia University in Glenside/Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The conference will run from September 28-30 2018, with full day pre-conference events and a keynote September 27.

Both today and fifty years ago, violence and nonviolence were used as tactics as well as strategies. One might argue progress towards peace evades us. It isn’t particularly clear how to bring about sustainable change and progress. Are our notions and definitions of what constitutes violence and nonviolence oversimplified? What exactly has changed, if anything? What does revolutionary nonviolence, pacifism, and militancy look like then compared to now? How do we understand these terms and definitions today? How is revolutionary nonviolence expressed, practiced or utilized in this current political environment? What lessons and ideas still resonate? From the passive to the coercive, and from the Gandhian to the guerrilla, what are effective means of struggle today, and how are they different from the past?

Sep
29
Sat
BMore Historic Unconference @ Baltimore Museum of Industry
Sep 29 @ 8:30 am – 4:00 pm

Bmore Historic is a participant-led unconference for scholars, students, professionals and volunteers who care about public history, historic preservation and cultural heritage in the Baltimore region. Bmore Historic is an opportunity to connect with local historians, humanities scholars, preservation advocates, museum professionals, archivists, and anyone interested in exploring the vital intersections between people, places and the past in Baltimore and Maryland. We’re bringing people together and you set the agenda.

Historians, preservationists, museum professionals, archivists and librarians and anyone who is excited about historic places are welcome. This event is not limited just to scholars or professionals. Students, volunteer preservation activists, Main Street board members, museum docents, educators and others are all encouraged to register and attend.

Oct
5
Fri
William Birch and the Complexities of American Visual Culture @ Library Company of Philadelphia
Oct 5 @ 8:15 am – 5:00 pm

William Birch and the Complexities of American Visual Culture explores the visual, cultural, and social themes elicited from the work of Philadelphia artist William Birch (1755-1834) in celebration of the anniversary of VCP.  The symposium in collaboration with William Birch, Ingenious Artist: His Life, His Philadelphia Views, and His Legacy aims to promote broad discussions on the continual resonance in American visual culture of the work of this premier enamel miniaturist, aspiring gentleman, and artist of the first American viewbooks.

What can be learned from works conceived and executed by a non-native artist parallel to constantly (and infinitely) evolving fields and definitions of art, and means of art production, distribution, innovation, and appreciation?

 

Oct
27
Sat
Is It Cost Effective? The Economics of Historic Preservation @ West ABC, Campus Center, Rutgers-Camden
Oct 27 @ 9:00 am – 3:00 pm

This workshop will introduce participants to the economic value of historic preservation and how to critically evaluate a potential project on its economic merits. Whether you are serving on a local historic preservation commission or considering a rehabilitation project of your own, you will become familiar with the concepts, measures, and tools used by real estate investors to determine a project’s economic viability. As part of the workshop, participants will gain hands-on experience critically evaluating potential projects.

Oct
31
Wed
2018 NJ Governor’s Conference on Volunteerism and Service @ Hyatt Regency, New Brunswick
Oct 31 @ 7:30 am – 3:30 pm
Nov
15
Thu
11th Annual Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age @ Kislak Center of Special Collections, Rare Books, and Manuscripts
Nov 15 @ 5:00 pm – Nov 17 @ 6:00 pm

In partnership with the Rare Book Department of the Free Library of Philadelphia, the Schoenberg Institute of Manuscript Studies (SIMS) at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries is pleased to announce the 11th Annual Lawrence J. Schoenberg Symposium on Manuscript Studies in the Digital Age.

Manuscript illumination has often been considered in relation to the texts it accompanies, but rarely in terms of its interplay with other artistic media. Historically, however, the technique was closely associated with other forms of artistic expression and served as a crucial point of contact and transfer for visual motifs across space and time. The goal of this year’s symposium is to examine cases of intermedial exchange through the lenses of technique, style, iconography, social context, and cultural geography, while also posing broader questions about the deep connections between the craft of illumination and other arts more widely. Of special interest will be insights gained from the technical examination of works in different media, new comparisons made possible by digital technology, and the discovery of linkages once obscured by strict historiographical divisions

Mar
7
Thu
Fabulous Leviathan: Visions of New York City in Modern Spanish Culture, 1875-1975 Seminar @ Georgetown University
Mar 7 – Mar 10 all-day