Jan
25
Mon
Unconscious Bias Series: Workshop #1 [RACE]
Jan 25 @ 10:00 am – 11:30 am

Join the Greater Philadelphia Cultural Alliance for the Unconscious Bias Series, as we explore how Unconscious Bias impacts arts and cultural organizations and affects their ability to connect and engage new and existing audiences. This virtual series is designed to help arts professionals identify implicit biases and develop systems to prevent biases for deeper engagement with their communities. Through four, 90-minute workshops, participants will learn more about implicit biases in race, gender, class and accessibility. This series geared toward arts and culture professionals in marketing, program development, and leadership.

What is Unconscious Bias? Bias is a form of prejudice that is used to favor or other a characteristic, person or group. There are two types of biases, Conscious, which is explicit bias and Unconscious, which is implicit. Unconscious bias is derived from the subconscious in which social stereotypes constructed by society influence the individual’s decisions without their full awareness.

The series begins on January 25, 2021 in exploring racial bias with a panel of art community experts. Panelists will give insights into their work and provide practical and tactical steps to addressing racial bias in your organization.

 

Panelists:

  • Donna Walker-Khune, Founder, Walker Communications Group
  • Elizabeth Grimaldi, Executive Director, Fleisher Arts Memorial
  • Anthony Martinez-Briggs, theater and teaching artist, The Wilma Theater
Jan
27
Wed
THE COLOR OF LAW: A FORGOTTEN HISTORY OF HOW OUR GOVERNMENT SEGREGATED AMERICA – VIRTUAL BOOK TALK WITH RICHARD ROTHSTEIN AND LILA CORWIN BERMAN
Jan 27 @ 6:00 pm

Listen in as Richard Rothstein and Lila Corwin Berman discuss contemporary racial segregation across the United States. The panelists will dig into the history of public housing projects, suburbanization, and the actions of the federal housing administration and then interrogate the racial segregation and income gap in America today as a byproduct of explicit government policies at the local, state and federal levels. Touching on the negative effects of these policies on African Americans and the United States as a whole, Rothstein and Berman will address how Jewish Americans specifically benefited from and suffered as a result of these policies.

About the speakers:
Richard Rothstein is a national best selling author, a Distinguished Fellow of the Economic Policy Institute and a Senior Fellow (emeritus) at the Thurgood Marshall Institute of the NAACP Legal Fund.

Lila Corwin Berman is the Director of the Feinstein Center for American Jewish History and the Murray Friedman Chair of American Jewish History at Temple University. Berman is also the author of the recently released The American Jewish Philanthropic Complex: The Historical Formation of a Multi-Billion Dollar Institution.

Our Fair City Virtual Conversation: In-Between
Jan 27 @ 7:00 pm

Streetscape adaptations during the pandemic have demonstrated both possibilities and pitfalls. Now it’s time to move from improvisation to planning. How can New York plot a wholesale reorganization of the way we use streets—more than a quarter of the city’s land—less as a grid of channels to sluice vehicles around and more as a collective outdoors where eating, commuting, playing, selling, working, and innumerable other activities all coexist. For the third session in our series, Our Fair City: Building a More Equitable New York, critic and editor Justin Davidson talks to urban designer Justin Garrett Moore, landscape architect Kate Orff, and transit expert Shin-pei Tsay about how we can reimagine our public space.

This program will take place via Zoom Webinar. Registrants will receive the Zoom link the morning of the event. 

Jan
28
Thu
Environment and Climate: Coffee hour
Jan 28 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Join The AAM Environment & Climate Network Knowledge Sharing Committee as we hold a space for sharing, lessons learned and time to contribute to our knowledge warehouse for all aspects for greening a museum institution.

See what’s brewing at our Green Museums – Knowledge Committee

Jan
31
Sun
Diving Into History: The Historic Mikva’ot of the Lloyd Street Synagogue
Jan 31 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Take a dip into what we know about the historic mikva’ot (ritual baths) of the Lloyd Street Synagogue. Since 1845 Lloyd Street has been home to a mikvah(ritual bath) for use by the community.  As the synagogue evolved, so did the mikvah complex.

In this presentation, discover how the historic mikva’ot worked, how they fulfilled Jewish law, and the many phases of their history. This virtual event, delivered by Wendy Davis, the JMM volunteer coordinator,  is inspired by the questions asked by our visitors about this important part of the synagogue.

Feb
3
Wed
Newspapers in Genealogy Research @ New York Public Library
Feb 3 @ 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Discover the  abundant uses of historical newspapers for genealogical and local history information in the numerous digital collections available at NYPL.

Registration is required.

PLEASE CLICK HERE TO REGISTER

SLAVE DWELLINGS, MONUMENTS, AND THE UNITED DAUGHTERS OF THE CONFEDERACY @ Penn Museum
Feb 3 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

The history of America can be told through the buildings we preserve and the monuments we raise. For decades, that history has been revisionist. This lecture examines how iconography bolsters White supremacy and privilege.

Joseph McGill, Jr., is a history consultant for Magnolia Plantation in Charleston, SC, and the founder and director of The Slave Dwelling Project. Previously, as a field officer for the National Trust for Historic Preservation, Mr. McGill worked to revitalize the Sweet Auburn commercial district in Atlanta, GA, and to develop a management plan for the Mississippi Delta National Heritage Area. He is a former executive director of the African American Museum in Cedar Rapids, IA, and a former director of history and culture at Penn Center, St. Helena Island, SC. He has also served as a National Park Service park ranger at Fort Sumter National Monument in Charleston.

Feb
4
Thu
“Hoboken Talks” (live on YouTube/FB/Twitter) @ Hoboken Historical Museum
Feb 4 @ 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

The Hoboken Museum is pleased to launch a new live-streamed program in 2021: Hoboken Talks! Our first guest on Thursday, Jan. 21 at 7 pm, will be Mark Singleton, realtor and active volunteer and leader in local nonprofits such as the Hoboken Shelter. He will be interviewed by Museum Collections Manager Rand Hoppe, who also serves on the Shelter’s board. Upcoming guests will include photographer John Conn, who captured Hoboken spirit as a visitor in the 1970s, and writer/editor and volunteer extraordinaire Jack Silbert.

The talks will be streamed live on YouTube, as well as Facebook and Twitter. Viewers can submit questions using the chat feature. Use the buttons below to bookmark your preferred channel, or look us up by our handle “HobokenMuseum.”

CLICK HERE FOR YOUTUBE LINK

CLICK HERE FOR FACEBOOK LINK

CLICK HERE FOR TWITTER LINK

Feb
9
Tue
Artists Reshaping Narratives @ Museum of Modern Art
Feb 9 @ 5:00 pm

Who decides which stories are given prominence? We’ll continue to examine this question in the second iteration of Artists Reshaping Narratives. While founded as beacons of art and culture, historically museums have not represented all groups equally. One group that has continually challenged the representation and interpretation on gallery walls is contemporary artists. In this workshop, we’ll consider contemporary artists—like Doris Salcedo, Shahzia Sikander, and Jack Whitten—whose work critiques modes of representation. Through modeling of guided inquiry and activities, learn how contemporary art can be used with students to inspire critical thinking and conversation in the classroom. Presented in collaboration with Art21.

Register here for the February 9 at 5:00pm EST session.

Feb
10
Wed
REVOLUTION A Programmatic Collaboration between Black History Untold and the Penn Museum @ Penn Museum
Feb 10 @ 6:00 pm – 7:30 pm

The human story is the foundation for the Penn Museum’s collections, galleries, and exhibitions, shared in the hopes of fostering deeper understanding of cultures from around the globe. But where does the ownership of these stories begin and end? The Museum welcomes award-winning journalist and founder of Black History Untold Sofiya Ballin for a series exploring representation, stewardship and what it means to balance the two.

“I want people to know the price that was paid in African blood on the land of Haiti.”

The opening to REVOLUTION, a short documentary by Black History Untold, invites viewers to uncover the past through a series of 15 interviews with community elders and others as they recount history as they have experienced it. This screening will be followed with a presentation by Black History Untold Founder Sofiya Ballin on the vitality of oral history and the power human stories hold.