All Quiet on the Southern front (of Pennsylvania): A Recap of a WWI Symposium in York, Pennsylvania

The East Coast Branch of the WFA holds two World War I seminars every year in the Washington, D.C., Baltimore, and Philadelphia areas, bringing together scholars, students, and others who are interested in learning more about the “War to End All Wars.” This fall’s symposium took place on October 24th at the York County Heritage Trust and involved a full day of activities.

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An Auxiliary Nurse's Armistice Day

In November of 1920 Alma Adelaide Clarke had been home from the Great War for over year, but her tireless work on behalf of the Red Cross had yet to end. In recognition of her contribution, she, along with hundreds of other New York Red Cross workers received an invitation to participate in a parade on the second Armistice Day.

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Home Before The Leaves Fall

“Home Before the Leaves Fall: The Great War 1914-1918,” a collaborative commemoration of World War I by heritage and educational institutions through the City of Philadelphia, kicked off at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania on June 26. Peter John Williams, author of a pictorial history, Philadelphia The War Years delivered a talk that highlighted Philadelphia’s importance as the third largest city in the United States at the start of World War I and as a manufacturing powerhouse known as the “workshop of the world.” Nearly 60, 000 Philadelphia men and 2,000 Philadelphia women served in World War I and thousands more worked in factories and shipyards supporting the war effort. A large naval yard, munitions manufacturing, and an aviation training facility transformed Philadelphia during the years of the Great War into fully mobilized war time economy more commonly associated with the World War II home front.

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The Guns of August and The Dogs of War: Remembering and Forgetting America's Great War

At the time no one knew to call it World War One. In the mid-1910s it was widely termed the ‘Great War’ and later the ‘War To End All Wars,’ an especially ironic name given the role contemporary historians have argued WWI played in precipitating WWII. In fact the History Channel recently aired a three-part series treating the period from the mid-1910s through the mid-1940s as single era of warfare. This way of remembering World War I, as but a small part of a larger history, is common throughout the United States, although in sharp contrast to much of the rest of the English-speaking world.

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