A purposefully prosaic approach to digital pedagogy, or stealthing digitally

As a result of my involvement with the National Institute for Technology in Liberal Education (NITLE), I’m often asked how to introduce students to learning digitally. I have to confess I am tempted to answer, rather unhelpfully, digital pedagogy changes everything changes nothing. The more teaching I do digitally, the more I learn how to teach digitally, but I am always doing the same thing, facilitating student learning. The following tips build on the excellent work done for NITLE by Rebecca Frost Davis, Katherine D. Harris, Lisa Spiro, Kathryn Tomasek, and Adeline Koh and Jesse Stommel at Hybrid Pedagogy.

Pinterest for Public History

Pinterest is a virtual bulletin board to which users “pin” images. With 25 million users and the ability to drive more clicks than any other social media site, including Facebook, Pinterest is an alluring platform for public history. In June I offered a workshop at MARCH aimed at small- to medium-sized organizations with new users who have limited time to devote to social media.

Home Before The Leaves Fall

“Home Before the Leaves Fall: The Great War 1914-1918,” a collaborative commemoration of World War I by heritage and educational institutions through the City of Philadelphia, kicked off at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania on June 26. Peter John Williams, author of a pictorial history, Philadelphia The War Years delivered a talk that highlighted Philadelphia’s importance as the third largest city in the United States at the start of World War I and as a manufacturing powerhouse known as the “workshop of the world.” Nearly 60, 000 Philadelphia men and 2,000 Philadelphia women served in World War I and thousands more worked in factories and shipyards supporting the war effort. A large naval yard, munitions manufacturing, and an aviation training facility transformed Philadelphia during the years of the Great War into fully mobilized war time economy more commonly associated with the World War II home front.