Blog Archives

Exhibits of Freedom: Black History in Philadelphia Museums All Year Round

During my year as a graduate fellow at the Philadelphia History Museum at the Atwater-Kent, the most frequently requested lesson by visiting elementary and middle school groups was invariably the Quest for Freedom program. This ninety minute experience begins with

Posted in Bloggers Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

If You Care About Women, You Should Edit Wikipedia Differently

Although controversies over gender and Wikipedia have been in the news recently, a current study, It’s a Man’s Wikipedia? Assessing Gender Inequality in an Online Encyclopedia, using computational linguistics takes on gender bias in the encyclopedia as a whole. A team of

Posted in Bloggers Tagged with: , , , , , ,

A Winter Tour of Winterthur

Tucked away in the northwest corner of Delaware, at a DuPont family estate that opened as a museum in 1952, is the single largest collection of American antiques anywhere, at least according to our guide at the Winterthur Museum, Garden,

Posted in Bloggers Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

Telling Untold Histories: An Unconference for Public Historians

Much of the history I write involves absences, erasures, and silences in the historical record and I am a huge proponent of unconferences, so I was doubly excited to learn about an upcoming event that combines both! Telling Untold Histories:

Posted in Bloggers Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

The Many Meanings of ‘Memorial’

Over the last year as I prepared for a comprehensive PhD exam in public history and engaged in research for various essays, as well as for this monthly blog, I’ve become increasingly interested in the issue of what if anything

Posted in Bloggers Tagged with: , , , , , , , , , , ,

Redcoats, Hessians, and Smallpox (Oh My): Finding Forgotten 18th Century Histories at the Old Barracks

In the spring of 2011 two historians at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey created a course that brought students to several notable sites across the state while simultaneously teaching them about the origins of historic preservation programs nationwide, the rise

Posted in Bloggers Tagged with: , , , , , , , ,

An Auxiliary Nurse’s Armistice Day

In November of 1920 Alma Adelaide Clarke had been home from the Great War for over year, but her tireless work on behalf of the Red Cross had yet to end. In recognition of her contribution, she, along with hundreds of other New York Red Cross workers received an invitation to participate in a parade on the second Armistice Day.

Posted in Bloggers Tagged with: , , , , , ,

CONNECT WITH US

rss email twitter facebook

THE ENCYCLOPEDIA OF GREATER PHILADELPHIA

Based at MARCH, with numerous community partners, The Encyclopedia of Greater Philadelphia is a civic project to increase understanding of one of America’s greatest cities. From abolition and the American Revolution to yellow fever and zoos (with cheesesteaks, rowhouses, and hundreds of other topics in between), the digital Encyclopedia and print volume will offer the most comprehensive, authoritative reference source ever created for the Philadelphia region.