Blog Archives

Two Kings and the NMAAHC

By Miriam Williams

Not seeing black people as active participants in American history and its ongoing push toward democracy always has been a hurtful and angering thing to me. It says to black people—and especially to black children who have little, if any, control over their education—that they are irrelevant and that black people have deserved all race-based mistreatment they’ve received, past or present.

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For Emerging Professionals: Museums and Historic Sites on a Budget

Philadelphia is a beautiful city with more than its fair share of amazing museums and historic sites. As a young professional, you might feel that visiting some, or most, or all of these museums and historic sites would benefit you, but you might not have the money or the time in which to do it. But there are plenty of ways in which visiting the city’s museums and historic sites will benefit you, and plenty of ways to take advantage of what they have to offer.

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Day-Tripping through Time: National Park History in Maryland and Pennsylvania

Inspired by the upcoming NPS centennial, which President Obama discussed in his most recent weekly address, I have spent parts of this summer posting about my visits to mid-western memorials, parks, and sites run by the NPS from central Ohio to eastern Missouri through a blog I named the National Park History Tour. Of course, one need not travel outside the Mid-Atlantic to learn about the past from the NPS, in fact one can cover over a century of American history in a weekend in Maryland and Pennsylvania.

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Whither Washingtoniana?

The building at 1990 K Street NW. Photograph taken by Matthew Gilmore.

By Matthew Gilmore

As the temporary closure of Martin Luther King Memorial Library in Washington DC for long-overdue renovation draws nigh, a huge question remains unanswered for the local history community—whither Washingtoniana?

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PoliticalFest in Philadelphia

The local Host Committee for the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, which runs from July 25 to July 28, consciously draws on the city’s key role in prior American political events in using the tagline “Lets Make History Again” as part of its marketing campaign. DNC week also offers a chance for both conventioneers and the general public to learn about American political history through a series of seven exhibits around Philadelphia collectively called PoliticalFest, which run from July 22 to July 27.

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Jersey Shore Public History: Community Education, Architectural Preservation, and Heritage Tourism

Although I did not realize it at the time, my first public history ‘gig’ was my high school summer job giving tours of Lucy the Elephant, a national historic landmark in Margate that was built in 1881 to draw potential land buyers to what was then the sparsely populated borough of ‘South Atlantic City.’ At that point the belly of the beast resembled a small gallery displaying a range of local historical artifacts, including a horse-drawn firehose cart, which were soon removed to the just opened Margate Historical Society Museum where they stayed on exhibit until the building itself was damaged by Hurricane Sandy.

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Date Night: The Old Fashioned Way

My wife’s idea of a good date night does not usually involve a visit to a tavern or a historic site. Her ideal date would involve a nice meal at an elegant restaurant and an entertaining show, and then ice cream, of course. Last month, I was able to accomplish her ideal Date Night: The Old Fashioned Way with a trip to the Half Way House Restaurant and Swift Creek Mill Theatre in Chesterfield County, Virginia.

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MARCH promotes collaboration, innovation, and best practices in public humanities. We publish news of interest to public humanities professionals in the Mid-Atlantic region of New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, and the District of Columbia. Suggestions and submissions are welcome.

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