Calendar

Nov
17
Thu
USDAC Culture/Shift 2016 Livestreaming Sessions
Nov 17 @ 7:10 pm – Nov 19 @ 5:30 pm

The U.S. Department of Arts and Culture, a grassroots arts and culture organization, is hosting its first national convening on community arts, cultural policy, and social Justice, Nov. 17-19, 2016, in St. Louis, MO. The organization will livestream several sessions and workshops, including Public Art and Public Memory, and Equity in Cultural Funding. A complete schedule and descriptions of livestreaming sessions is available here. The stream can be accessed via the USDAC Facebook page.

Nov
19
Sat
History, Memory, and Disability Rights: Creating Inclusive Public Humanities Programs @ Rutgers-Camden, Campus Center, Multipurpose Room
Nov 19 @ 8:00 am – 4:00 pm

“A regime of state-mandated segregation and degradation soon emerged that in its virulence and bigotry rivaled, and indeed paralleled, the worst excesses of Jim Crow.”–Justice Thurgood Marshall, Cleburne, 1985

Humanities Connection radio program by the New Jersey Council for the Humanities on this program, which aired October 30, 2016

“History, Memory, and Disability Rights: Creating Inclusive Public Humanities Programs,” a one-day public humanities conference and workshops that features current research on the complex and complicated historical narrative that is the disability rights movement in the mid-Atlantic region, will take place on Saturday, November 19, 2016, from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. at Rutgers University-Camden. It is sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic Regional Humanities Center at Rutgers-Camden and affiliated partners. The program will focus on social attitudes and public policy efforts to marginalize individual citizens with developmental disabilities, as well as on the countervailing forces of institutionalization and deinstitutionalization. Afternoon workshops will address the use of history as a tool in community education and public advocacy pertaining to disability rights and interpretation of disability history at historic sites.

The mid-Atlantic region, comprised of New Jersey, Pennsylvania, New York, Maryland, and Delaware, played a pivotal role in the development and transformation of disability rights and public policy. At the dawn of the twentieth century, new scientific and social theories (such as eugenics) were indispensable in a shift in social attitudes and state government policy. The result was a well-organized campaign to isolate and eliminate citizens stigmatized as “feebleminded” or in some way “defective.” The terminology was abrasive and dehumanizing, and it served to deny individuals their freedom, dignity, and rights. In addition to legalized sterilization and anti-marriage legislation, more than a quarter million Americans with an intellectual or developmental disability were confined in 300 public institutions, a practice that continued well into the twenty-first century. New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania—in fact, each of the fifty states—each had its own experience with this nationwide trend.

Three-quarters of a century later, the states of the mid-Atlantic region witnessed some of the greatest moments in the disability rights freedom struggle. Often neglected in the mainstream historical narrative, the disability rights movement touches on a host of contemporary social, legal, and public policy issues. The experiences of people with disability also serve to remind us that history is something that happens to people.

A content-based symposium that includes both formal and informal presentations, and two afternoon workshops, this humanities forum will address neglected aspects of American and mid-Atlantic history. The workshops will have the added benefit of assessing a) how museums and historical societies can be more inclusive in content, interpretation, and community education efforts, and b) the relationship of history to disability rights and community-based advocacy. The day-long program will conclude with a roundtable discussion that includes educators, museum curators, advocates, self-advocates, and the general public.

The target audience includes museum and historic site specialists, curators and educators, research scholars, advocacy organizations, people living with disabilities, caregivers, and anyone with an interest in learning more and raising awareness about this important history.

This program is co-sponsored by the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, Rutgers University-Camden; the New Jersey Council for the Humanities; Millersville University; The Boggs Center on Developmental Disabilities, Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers University; The University of Delaware, Center for Disability Studies; Pennhurst Memorial and Preservation Alliance, Pennsylvania TASH; Pennsylvania History Coalition Honoring People with Disabilities; The Arc of Pennsylvania; and the Western Pennsylvania Disability History and Action Consortium.

MORE INFORMATION

REGISTRATION

Feb
10
Fri
Best Practices: Creating a Truly Inclusive Museum @ Ocean County Library (Bishop Building)
Feb 10 @ 9:30 am – 4:30 pm

More and more funders are asking you to serve diverse audiences and to be responsive to your community, but what does that mean? Join Gretchen Sullivan Sorin for this hands-on workshop that will provide you with useful resources for offering more inclusive programming.

The workshop will provide a broad overview on what diversity means, offer successful examples of how other museums are working to serve broader audiences, and help you to feel more comfortable talking about diversity.

Feb
15
Wed
Temple CWEST Black History Symposium – “Voices in the Struggle for Emancipation & Equal Rights” @ Walk Auditorium, Temple University Main Campus
Feb 15 @ 2:00 pm – 5:30 pm
Temple University Africology and African American Studies Department
presents the Fourteenth Annual
Underground Railroad & Black History Conference
Celebrating the 28th year of the Doctoral Program!
“Voices in the Struggle for Emancipation & Equal Rights”
 
Featuring Distinguished Speakers:
Quito Swan; Judith Giesberg; Amy Cohen;  Timothy Welbeck
Wednesday, February 15, 2017
2:00 – 5:30 pm
Temple University – Main Campus
Walk Auditorium – Ritter Hall
13th & Montgomery Streets Philadelphia, PA, 19122
Registration begins at 1:30 p.m.– Free and open to all
 
Temple University
Department of African American Studies presents
14th Annual Conference on Underground Railroad and Black History
in cooperation with
CHAT/CWEST Civil War and Emancipation Studies
Sponsored by Civil War Museum and DAAS
Speakers:
Dr. Quito Swan, Associate Professor, African Diaspora Studies
Department of History, Howard University
&
Dr. Judith Giesberg, Professor of History
 Director of Graduate Program, Villanova University
Panel Chair: Timothy Welbeck, Esq. Respondent: Amy Cohen
Conference Schedule
  2:00-2:15 Registration and Welcome
  2:15-3:00 Session 1: Quito Swan
  3:00-3:15 Comments  and Questions
  3:20-4:00 Session 2:  Judith Giesberg
  4:00-4:15 Comments  and Questions
  4:20-4:40  Intermission – Book Display
  4:40-5:20  Session 3: Panel on Major Octavius V. Catto: Honoring Philadelphia’s Hero
                                      Timothy Welbeck and Amy Cohen
  5:20-5:30 Comments/Questions
  5:30 pm: Closing Remarks
Feb
19
Sun
2017 Small Museum Association Conference – “All Hands On Deck” @ Marriott Hotel & Conference Center
Feb 19 @ 12:30 pm – Feb 21 @ 12:00 pm

The annual SMA conference attracts more than 250 museum professionals, board members, and volunteers from a wide variety of small museums. They attend sessions on topics ranging from collections and education to staffing and board issues. The 33rd Annual Conference will offer sessions that address the theme “All Hands on Deck.” Speakers will explore how professional staff, board members and volunteers work together to make small museums thrive. Sunday, February 19 will feature two afternoon workshops as well as a reception in the Resource Hall. On Monday the 20th will feature a keynote address as well as sessions and an evening banquet. Tuesday’s half-day program will be composed of a plenary speech and sessions. Advanced Registration deadline is January 20, 2017.

Feb
24
Fri
Best Practices: Creating a Truly Inclusive Museum @ Cranford Community Center
Feb 24 @ 9:30 am – 4:00 pm

More and more funders are asking you to serve diverse audiences and to be responsive to your community, but what does that mean? Join Gretchen Sullivan Sorin for this hands-on workshop that will provide you with useful resources for offering more inclusive programming.

The workshop will provide a broad overview on what diversity means, offer successful examples of how other museums are working to serve broader audiences, and help you to feel more comfortable talking about diversity.

Note: the same workshop is also being held on Feb. 10, 2017. This is NOT part 2.

Mar
8
Wed
7th Annual Public History Community Forum @ Benjamin Franklin Hall of the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia
Mar 8 @ 8:30 am – 3:00 pm

PubComm is an annual graduate-student organized event designed to spark ideas and collaboration between Philadelphia-area public history professionals and students. It is presented with the generous support of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities at Rutgers-Camden and The Center for Public History at Temple University. This year’s theme is “‘This is Why We Fight’: Public History for the Public Good” and will feature archivists, educators, and museum professionals who use public history principles and programming to address issues of social justice and advocacy within their local community and beyond. Annie Polland, Senior Vice President of Education & Programs at New York’s Lower East Side Tenement Museum, will present the keynote.

Other presenters include:

  • Ismael Jimenez, M.Ed., Philadelphia Black History Collaborative
  • Sean Kelley, Director of Interpretation, Eastern State Penitentiary
  • Mary Mark Ockerbloom, Wikipedian in Residence, Chemical Heritage Foundation
  • Margery Sly, Director of Special Collections Research Center, Temple University

Transportation and Parking:

Benjamin Franklin Hall, at 427 Chestnut Street, is conveniently located within a few minutes’ walk from both the SEPTA Market-Frankford Line (5th Street Station) and the PATCO rail line (8th & Market St. Station). It is also within close proximity to several pay-to-park garages.

Mar
18
Sat
Preservation in Practice: A Primer for Historic Preservation Commissions @ EcoComplex
Mar 18 all-day

1-day workshop
This one-day workshop is open to all preservationists, but specifically geared toward those serving on a local commission. This program is designed to benefit both new and experienced commission members as well as being relevant for planning and zoning board members and elected officials. The course provides an in-depth examination of current topics and issues relevant to integrating preservation into community planning and zoning. Focus will be on legal parameters for implementing a commission, conducting an effective public meeting, and understanding and implementing tools to combat deteriorated, neglected, vacant and abandoned properties. Participants will also become acquainted with New Jersey’s redevelopment law and how it can be used to benefit historic properties.

Instructors: Dorothy Guzzo, Executive Director, NJ Historic Trust; Janine Bauer, Esq.; Jonathan Kinney, CLG Coordinator, Historic Preservation Office
Date: Saturday, March 18, 2017
Time: 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Credits: .7 CEUs

Dorothy P. Guzzo was appointed executive director of the New Jersey Historic Trust in 2008. From 1995 to 2008, as the deputy state historic preservation officer for New Jersey, she oversaw the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places, project certification to qualify for Investment Tax Credits, certifying local governments for implementing programs on the municipal level, historic and archaeological resource inventory and resource protection through state and federal regulations. She has held elected office and served on her municipal planning board and local historic preservation commission. Ms. Guzzo is currently serving on the New Jersey Heritage Tourism Task Force charged with creating a Heritage Tourism Master Plan for the state of New Jersey.

Mar
24
Fri
22nd Annual Barnes Club Graduate Student History Conference @ Temple University, Center City Campus
Mar 24 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

The Barnes Club Conference will be held Friday evening March 24 and Saturday March 25, 2017, from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM at Temple’s Center City Campus in downtown Philadelphia. The Barnes Club Conference is one of the largest and most prestigious graduate student conferences in the region, drawing participants from across the nation and around the world.

Mar
25
Sat
22nd Annual Barnes Club Graduate Student History Conference @ Temple University, Center City Campus
Mar 25 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

The Barnes Club Conference will be held Friday evening March 24 and Saturday March 25, 2017, from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM at Temple’s Center City Campus in downtown Philadelphia. The Barnes Club Conference is one of the largest and most prestigious graduate student conferences in the region, drawing participants from across the nation and around the world.