Calendar

Mar
25
Sat
22nd Annual Barnes Club Graduate Student History Conference @ Temple University, Center City Campus
Mar 25 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

The Barnes Club Conference will be held Friday evening March 24 and Saturday March 25, 2017, from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM at Temple’s Center City Campus in downtown Philadelphia. The Barnes Club Conference is one of the largest and most prestigious graduate student conferences in the region, drawing participants from across the nation and around the world.

Mar
31
Fri
Diverse Unfreedoms and Their Ghosts @ Rutgers University-Camden Campus Center
Mar 31 @ 9:00 am – 6:00 pm

Keynote Speaker: Dr. Orlando Patterson

orlando patterson image

“Powers in Persons: An Anatomy of Unfreedoms from Slavery to Child and Bridal Servitude.”

Multi-Purpose Room: 4:15 – 5:30

A public reception will follow Dr. Patterson’s talk.

This one-day conference brings together research on the diversity of practices, identities, and institutions of unfreedom—in the past and present, in the United States and beyond—and how the ghosts of those diverse unfreedoms continue to inhabit, animate, and haunt the present. It aims to explore what freedoms and unfreedoms mean by examining four key moments or sites:

  • Relationships between diverse unfreedoms (such as slavery, imprisonment, captivity, serfdom, domestic service, caste, etc.) as people understand and negotiate them, in autobiographical narratives, fiction, court cases, disputes, etc.
  • Transitions between social institutions and practices of unfreedom.
  • Aspirations for freedom and the kind of utopian futures that are proposed as part of them.
  • The legacies, echoes, and traces of unfreedom in a context of “freedom.”

Towards these ends, conference presentations will tackle a range of formations related to rethinking freedom and unfreedom in the United States and beyond, including (but not limited to) the meanings of democracy in post-apartheid South Africa, the traces of chattel bondage in the post-Reconstruction South, the surveillance of black women in public housing in the northeastern United States, the status of so-called liberated children in late-nineteenth century Senegal, definitions of autonomy in an Indonesian boarding school for girls, stasis and stillness as radical and redemptive political strategies, and apologies for white supremacy in the Civil Rights South.

Apr
2
Sun
Museum Association of New York Annual Conference @ National Museum of Dance and The Gideon Putnam in Saratoga Springs, NY
Apr 2 – Apr 4 all-day
Museums continually work to inspire and engage their audiences, develop innovative programming and make lasting connections. They experiment with new strategies in collections management, interpretation and exhibition design. Visitors are changing the way museums think about themselves. Museums are responding by working to transform visitor and donor perceptions of their institutions to be essential and vital resources in their communities.
Join museum professionals from across the state to share how your institution is changing trends, testing boundaries and altering views.
Apr
8
Sat
Cemeteries and Historic Preservation: Workshop and Tour of The Woodlands and Mount Moriah Cemetery @ The Woodlands
Apr 8 all-day

1-day workshop
Through a combination of classroom instruction and on-site exploration, workshop participants will learn about Philadelphia’s rural cemeteries and their historical context, as well as how to assess a cemetery’s  preservation needs and  possible treatments. Students will learn from the example of a targeted condition assessment of family burial lots that staff and student interns from the National Park Service’s Northeast Region Office carried out at Philadelphia’s Laurel Hill Cemetery as part of a larger strategic planning effort launched by the cemetery. Turning to The Woodlands and Mount Moriah Cemetery, students will explore the wide range of stone types,  and other materials, used to construct monuments and their cemetery environments, how and why those materials deteriorate over time, and what responsible efforts can be used to slow that deterioration. Instructors will also discuss the importance of documenting changing cemetery landscapes and modes of commemoration as well as the history of rural cemeteries in the Philadelphia region and elsewhere. The workshop will begin at The Woodlands, with classroom presentation followed by a tour of The Woodlands as an outdoor classroom. After lunch, the class will travel to nearby historic Mount Moriah Cemetery to discuss its preservation challenges.

Originally the site of the estate of William Hamilton, 54-acre landscape of The Woodlands became a 19th-century rural cemetery in 1840. In 2006, it was designated a National Historic Landmark District in recognition of its unique history and rich resources.  Established in 1855, Mount Moriah Cemetery also originally consisted of 54 acres, though today it comprises approximately 200 acres in Philadelphia and Yeadon. The cemetery, which has been poorly maintained for decades, with many of its historic sections overgrown and wooded, has become the project of the Friends of Mount Moriah Cemetery, an organization dedicated to the cemetery’s preservation and promotion through community engagement, education, historic research, and restoration.

This workshops involves both classroom instruction and outdoor activities. Please wear comfortable walking shoes and dress for the weather.

Instructors: Dennis Montagna and Aaron Wunsch
Date: Saturday, Apr. 8, 2017
Time: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Location: The Woodlands and Mt. Moriah cemeteries
Credits: .6 CEUs

Dr. Dennis Montagna directs the National Park Service’s Monument Research & Preservation Program, based at the Park Service’s Philadelphia Region Office. He chaired the federal review panel that selected the design and oversaw the completion of the African Burial Ground Memorial at the burial site of thousands of enslaved and free Africans in lower Manhattan. His publications and lectures include examinations of the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial in Washington, DC, the photographs that Eudora Welty shot in Mississippi cemeteries in the 1930s, efforts to preserve mental institution burial grounds, and the memorial that Franklin Roosevelt designed for his grave at Hyde Park, NY. Dennis holds BA degrees in Studio Art and Art History from Florida State University, a master’s degree in Art History from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a PhD from the University of Delaware. He serves as vice president of the Association for Gravestone Studies and chairs that organization’s Conservation Committee. He is a former chair of the American Institute for Conservation’s Architecture Specialty Group.

Dr. Aaron Wunsch is an architectural historian and assistant professor in the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate Program in Historic Preservation. His seminars have focused on broad aspects of the American cultural landscape, from commercial architecture, to cemeteries and suburbs, to cartography and the idea of landscape itself. His publications and papers have addressed such diverse topics as the rural cemetery movement in Philadelphia, the formation of Charlottesville, VA’s, park system, and the architecture of early electric utilities. He is also an active preservationist. He has served as vice president of Virginia’s Preservation Piedmont, written numerous reports for the Historic American Buildings Survey, and been employed by that agency, the Cambridge [MA] Historical Commission, and the Massachusetts Historical Commission. Aaron holds a BA from Haverford College, an M.Arch.Hist. from the University of Virginia, and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

Apr
10
Mon
Find Your Perfect Match: Grantmakers and History Organizations, Perfect Together @ Cherry Hill Public Library
Apr 10 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm

Maybe you have a great idea for an exhibit, or you want to work with a neighborhood organization on an outreach project. Perhaps your building needs a new HVAC system, or you want to develop a strategic plan. What sorts of grants are available to history organizations to help pay for these types of projects? How do you find the right funder for your needs? What are the requirements and expectations of different funders?

Join us on April 10 at the Cherry Hill Public Library to hear from some of New Jersey’s top funders about what they look for in successful proposals. This conversation with funders, sponsored by the New Jersey Historical Commission, the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities, the New Jersey Historic Trust, and the New Jersey Council on the Humanities, will help answer these questions and introduce workshop participants to the range of grant funding available, from government agencies to private foundations to corporate funders.

Panelists include Sara Cureton, Director, the New Jersey Historical Commission; Gigi Naglak, Director of Grants and Programs, the New Jersey Council for the Humanities; Lois Greco, Senior Vice President, Evaluations, Wells Fargo Regional Foundation; Sharnita Johnson, Program Director, Arts, the Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation; Bill Leavens, VP of Operations, The Leavens Foundation; and Nina Stack, CEO, the New Jersey Council for Grantmakers.

Workshop participants will be asked to come prepared to talk about their projects and funding needs, and time will be set aside to discuss strategies. The workshop will conclude with a networking lunch.

A similar workshop will be held on October 10 at Washington’s Headquarters, Morristown National Historical Park.

Cosponsors:

NJHC LogoNew Jersey Council for the Humanities

Apr
21
Fri
Pippi to Ripley 4: Sex and Gender in Children’s Literature, Fantasy, Science Fiction, and Comics @ Ithaca College
Apr 21 @ 8:00 am – Apr 22 @ 5:00 pm

Pippi to Ripley 4 is an interdisciplinary conference with a focus on women and gender in imaginative fiction. This year’s

conference includes a special focus on Fan Intersectionality: Race, Gender and Sexuality in Fan Communities.

Ithaca College, April 21-22, 2017

Keynote: SAMMUS performs her acclaimed nerdcore hip-hop and talks about race, geekdom, and feminism.

Special guest: Breakout YA author LJ Alonge, author of The Blacktop series of YA novels.

Apr
28
Fri
Oral History in the Mid-Atlantic Region Conference @ Columbia University
Apr 28 – Apr 29 all-day
Apr
29
Sat
The Early Colonial Delaware Valley—An Archaeological and Historical Symposium @ New Castle Court House Museum
Apr 29 @ 9:00 am – 4:30 pm

Now in its 10th year, the symposium is dedicated to building a regional-level dialog that can identify the uniqueness of the cultures that existed in the Delaware Valley during the early period of European colonization. Persons interested in making a presentation at the symposium should submit an abstract no later than March 31, 2017.

Admission to the symposium is free and open to the public. To submit an abstract or to make a reservation to attend the symposium, contact Craig Lukezic at craig.lukezic@state.de.us or call 302-736-7407.

May
11
Thu
Telling Untold Stories Unconference @ Rutgers University-Newark
May 11 all-day

Every place, every person, and every object has a history, but not all histories are told.

Telling Untold Histories is New Jersey’s annual unconference on public history, museums, cultural heritage and education. We look for human stories yet to be told, explore these histories and ask why some stories are repeated while others remain on the margins. How can the community members who lived these histories shape how museums, historic sites, libraries, and schools tell them in the future?

Because we value the knowledge you bring, this unconference puts you at the center. Participants create the program by suggesting and choosing sessions on the day of the unconference. Feel the suspense building! Workshops offer attendees the chance to learn new skills to help you tell stories. Discussions and activities connect you with new people and leave you inspired.

Join us at Rutgers University-Newark on May 11, 2017 to challenge the usual way we talk about the past and expand what counts as history.

Learn more at Telling Untold Histories

 

Oct
7
Sat
Historic Preservation Workshop: Interpretive Planning for Historic Sites and Museums: Why, What, and How @ Alice Paul Institute
Oct 7 all-day

What is interpretive planning? Essentially it combines all the elements that create an optimal visitor experience at a historic site, exhibition, or museum. At this workshop we will consider the interpretive planning process and discuss the various elements that are included in an interpretive plan. We will discuss experiences that participants have had—both positive and negative—in visiting historic sites or exhibitions, and we will apply these experiences to an interactive session based on a current exhibition installed at the Alice Paul Institute. Participants will learn why interpretive planning should be an essential part of any strategic or master planning exercise at a historic and/or cultural institution.

Instructor: Page Talbott
Dates: Saturday, October 7, 2017
Time: 9:30 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Location: Alice Paul Institute, Mount Laurel, NJ
Cost: $60
Credits: .5 CEUs

Dr. Page Talbott is a senior fellow at the Center for Cultural Partnerships at Drexel University and is the principal consultant at Talbott Exhibits and Planning. From 2013 to June 2016, she served as president of the Historical Society of Pennsylvania. Among her career highlights are her role as associate director of the Benjamin Franklin Tercentenary and chief curator of Benjamin Franklin: In Search of a Better World, the international traveling exhibition commemorating the anniversary of Franklin’s 300th birthday (2003–2008), and the creation of the content for the Benjamin Franklin Museum at Franklin Court, which opened in August 2013. She has also served as senior project manager to assist the Barnes Foundation with its collection move from Merion to Philadelphia; consulting curator for 15 years for Moore College of Art & Design; consultant for the Philadelphia documentary company History Making Productions; and planning consultant for dozens of historical organizations including Historic Morven, the Lancaster County Historical Society, and Historic Germantown. Dr. Talbott is the author and editor of several books and monographs, as well as dozens of articles on a variety of topics, ranging from American fine and decorative arts to cultural history. She has lectured and taught extensively, on a variety of topics. Dr. Talbott holds a BA from Wellesley College, an MA from the University of Delaware/Winterthur Program in American Material Culture, and an MA and PhD in American Civilization from the University of Pennsylvania.