Calendar

Feb
24
Fri
Best Practices: Creating a Truly Inclusive Museum @ Cranford Community Center
Feb 24 @ 9:30 am – 4:00 pm

More and more funders are asking you to serve diverse audiences and to be responsive to your community, but what does that mean? Join Gretchen Sullivan Sorin for this hands-on workshop that will provide you with useful resources for offering more inclusive programming.

The workshop will provide a broad overview on what diversity means, offer successful examples of how other museums are working to serve broader audiences, and help you to feel more comfortable talking about diversity.

Note: the same workshop is also being held on Feb. 10, 2017. This is NOT part 2.

Mar
8
Wed
7th Annual Public History Community Forum @ Benjamin Franklin Hall of the American Philosophical Society in Philadelphia
Mar 8 @ 8:30 am – 3:00 pm

PubComm is an annual graduate-student organized event designed to spark ideas and collaboration between Philadelphia-area public history professionals and students. It is presented with the generous support of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Center for the Humanities at Rutgers-Camden and The Center for Public History at Temple University. This year’s theme is “‘This is Why We Fight’: Public History for the Public Good” and will feature archivists, educators, and museum professionals who use public history principles and programming to address issues of social justice and advocacy within their local community and beyond. Annie Polland, Senior Vice President of Education & Programs at New York’s Lower East Side Tenement Museum, will present the keynote.

Other presenters include:

  • Ismael Jimenez, M.Ed., Philadelphia Black History Collaborative
  • Sean Kelley, Director of Interpretation, Eastern State Penitentiary
  • Mary Mark Ockerbloom, Wikipedian in Residence, Chemical Heritage Foundation
  • Margery Sly, Director of Special Collections Research Center, Temple University

Transportation and Parking:

Benjamin Franklin Hall, at 427 Chestnut Street, is conveniently located within a few minutes’ walk from both the SEPTA Market-Frankford Line (5th Street Station) and the PATCO rail line (8th & Market St. Station). It is also within close proximity to several pay-to-park garages.

Mar
18
Sat
Preservation in Practice: A Primer for Historic Preservation Commissions @ EcoComplex
Mar 18 all-day

1-day workshop
This one-day workshop is open to all preservationists, but specifically geared toward those serving on a local commission. This program is designed to benefit both new and experienced commission members as well as being relevant for planning and zoning board members and elected officials. The course provides an in-depth examination of current topics and issues relevant to integrating preservation into community planning and zoning. Focus will be on legal parameters for implementing a commission, conducting an effective public meeting, and understanding and implementing tools to combat deteriorated, neglected, vacant and abandoned properties. Participants will also become acquainted with New Jersey’s redevelopment law and how it can be used to benefit historic properties.

Instructors: Dorothy Guzzo, Executive Director, NJ Historic Trust; Janine Bauer, Esq.; Jonathan Kinney, CLG Coordinator, Historic Preservation Office
Date: Saturday, March 18, 2017
Time: 9:00 a.m.-4:00 p.m.
Credits: .7 CEUs

Dorothy P. Guzzo was appointed executive director of the New Jersey Historic Trust in 2008. From 1995 to 2008, as the deputy state historic preservation officer for New Jersey, she oversaw the New Jersey and National Registers of Historic Places, project certification to qualify for Investment Tax Credits, certifying local governments for implementing programs on the municipal level, historic and archaeological resource inventory and resource protection through state and federal regulations. She has held elected office and served on her municipal planning board and local historic preservation commission. Ms. Guzzo is currently serving on the New Jersey Heritage Tourism Task Force charged with creating a Heritage Tourism Master Plan for the state of New Jersey.

Mar
24
Fri
22nd Annual Barnes Club Graduate Student History Conference @ Temple University, Center City Campus
Mar 24 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

The Barnes Club Conference will be held Friday evening March 24 and Saturday March 25, 2017, from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM at Temple’s Center City Campus in downtown Philadelphia. The Barnes Club Conference is one of the largest and most prestigious graduate student conferences in the region, drawing participants from across the nation and around the world.

Mar
25
Sat
22nd Annual Barnes Club Graduate Student History Conference @ Temple University, Center City Campus
Mar 25 @ 9:00 am – 5:00 pm

The Barnes Club Conference will be held Friday evening March 24 and Saturday March 25, 2017, from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM at Temple’s Center City Campus in downtown Philadelphia. The Barnes Club Conference is one of the largest and most prestigious graduate student conferences in the region, drawing participants from across the nation and around the world.

Apr
8
Sat
Cemeteries and Historic Preservation: Workshop and Tour of The Woodlands and Mount Moriah Cemetery @ The Woodlands
Apr 8 all-day

1-day workshop
Through a combination of classroom instruction and on-site exploration, workshop participants will learn about Philadelphia’s rural cemeteries and their historical context, as well as how to assess a cemetery’s  preservation needs and  possible treatments. Students will learn from the example of a targeted condition assessment of family burial lots that staff and student interns from the National Park Service’s Northeast Region Office carried out at Philadelphia’s Laurel Hill Cemetery as part of a larger strategic planning effort launched by the cemetery. Turning to The Woodlands and Mount Moriah Cemetery, students will explore the wide range of stone types,  and other materials, used to construct monuments and their cemetery environments, how and why those materials deteriorate over time, and what responsible efforts can be used to slow that deterioration. Instructors will also discuss the importance of documenting changing cemetery landscapes and modes of commemoration as well as the history of rural cemeteries in the Philadelphia region and elsewhere. The workshop will begin at The Woodlands, with classroom presentation followed by a tour of The Woodlands as an outdoor classroom. After lunch, the class will travel to nearby historic Mount Moriah Cemetery to discuss its preservation challenges.

Originally the site of the estate of William Hamilton, 54-acre landscape of The Woodlands became a 19th-century rural cemetery in 1840. In 2006, it was designated a National Historic Landmark District in recognition of its unique history and rich resources.  Established in 1855, Mount Moriah Cemetery also originally consisted of 54 acres, though today it comprises approximately 200 acres in Philadelphia and Yeadon. The cemetery, which has been poorly maintained for decades, with many of its historic sections overgrown and wooded, has become the project of the Friends of Mount Moriah Cemetery, an organization dedicated to the cemetery’s preservation and promotion through community engagement, education, historic research, and restoration.

This workshops involves both classroom instruction and outdoor activities. Please wear comfortable walking shoes and dress for the weather.

Instructors: Dennis Montagna and Aaron Wunsch
Date: Saturday, Apr. 8, 2017
Time: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Location: The Woodlands and Mt. Moriah cemeteries
Credits: .6 CEUs

Dr. Dennis Montagna directs the National Park Service’s Monument Research & Preservation Program, based at the Park Service’s Philadelphia Region Office. He chaired the federal review panel that selected the design and oversaw the completion of the African Burial Ground Memorial at the burial site of thousands of enslaved and free Africans in lower Manhattan. His publications and lectures include examinations of the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial in Washington, DC, the photographs that Eudora Welty shot in Mississippi cemeteries in the 1930s, efforts to preserve mental institution burial grounds, and the memorial that Franklin Roosevelt designed for his grave at Hyde Park, NY. Dennis holds BA degrees in Studio Art and Art History from Florida State University, a master’s degree in Art History from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and a PhD from the University of Delaware. He serves as vice president of the Association for Gravestone Studies and chairs that organization’s Conservation Committee. He is a former chair of the American Institute for Conservation’s Architecture Specialty Group.

Dr. Aaron Wunsch is an architectural historian and assistant professor in the University of Pennsylvania’s Graduate Program in Historic Preservation. His seminars have focused on broad aspects of the American cultural landscape, from commercial architecture, to cemeteries and suburbs, to cartography and the idea of landscape itself. His publications and papers have addressed such diverse topics as the rural cemetery movement in Philadelphia, the formation of Charlottesville, VA’s, park system, and the architecture of early electric utilities. He is also an active preservationist. He has served as vice president of Virginia’s Preservation Piedmont, written numerous reports for the Historic American Buildings Survey, and been employed by that agency, the Cambridge [MA] Historical Commission, and the Massachusetts Historical Commission. Aaron holds a BA from Haverford College, an M.Arch.Hist. from the University of Virginia, and a PhD from the University of California, Berkeley.

Apr
21
Fri
Pippi to Ripley 4: Sex and Gender in Children’s Literature, Fantasy, Science Fiction, and Comics @ Ithaca College
Apr 21 @ 8:00 am – Apr 22 @ 5:00 pm

Pippi to Ripley 4 is an interdisciplinary conference with a focus on women and gender in imaginative fiction. This year’s

conference includes a special focus on Fan Intersectionality: Race, Gender and Sexuality in Fan Communities.

Ithaca College, April 21-22, 2017

Keynote: SAMMUS performs her acclaimed nerdcore hip-hop and talks about race, geekdom, and feminism.

Special guest: Breakout YA author LJ Alonge, author of The Blacktop series of YA novels.

Apr
28
Fri
Oral History in the Mid-Atlantic Region Conference @ Columbia University
Apr 28 – Apr 29 all-day
Oct
12
Thu
Pennsylvania Historical Association Annual Meeting @ Lackawanna Historical Society
Oct 12 – Oct 14 all-day

The Lackawanna Historical Society will host the 2017 PHA Annual Meeting from October 12 – 14, 2017. Conference sites will include the Catlin House, Radisson Lackawanna Station Hotel, Heritage Room of the University of Scranton Library, and Steamtown National Historic Site. While proposals on all aspects of Pennsylvania and Mid-Atlantic history are encouraged, the program committee invites submissions on the theme, “Public Histories of the Mid- Atlantic,” which explores the many ways in which the public engages with the past.  Local Arrangements Chair Mary Ann Moran-Savakinus and Program Committee Chair Silad Chamberlin look forward to welcoming you to the conference.

 

Nov
4
Sat
Architecture in Color: Historic Paints and Finishes, Their Investigation and Reproduction @ Campus Center, Rutgers-Camden
Nov 4 all-day

Historic architecture is known to us in primary source materials through drawings or early black-and-white photography.  What’s missing is color and the finishing of a building that makes all the difference in its appearance. Through lectures and hands-on lab work, workshop participants will learn what traditional paints were made of, how they were used, and ways to investigate the finishes history of a building.

Instructor: Janet W. Foster
Dates: Saturday, November 4, 2017
Time: 9:00 a.m.-3:00 p.m.
Location: Campus Center, Rutgers-Camden
Cost: $75
Credits: .6 CEUs

Janet W. Foster is an architectural historian and historic preservation consultant with over 30 years of experience. She studied at the Columbia University Historic Preservation Program and then founded Acroterion, a preservation consulting firm, in 1983. At Acroterion, she had the opportunity to study hundreds of buildings in New Jersey, New York, and Pennsylvania through preparation of National Register nominations, Historic Structures Reports, historic buildings surveys, paint analysis, and other projects. Ms. Foster is a noted teacher and lecturer on historic architecture, with a particular specialization in historic paint colors and the use of books and magazines to transmit architectural ideas in 19th-century America. She is currently an adjunct professor in the Historic Preservation Program at Columbia University’s Graduate School of Architecture, Planning & Preservation.